Whispers from the Apple Orchard

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, as PRESIDENT of the United States and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do hereby make public proclamation to all whom it may concern that an invasion has been perpetrated upon the territory of the United States by Empire of Japan.

And, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution of the United States and the said sections of the United States Code, I do hereby further proclaim and direct that the conduct to be observed on the part of the United States toward all natives, citizens, denizens or subjects of Empire of Japan.

– President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Proclamation of December 7 and 8, 1941

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As the wind rushes down the slopes of the Eastern Sierras and Mt. Whitney, it gently calms the sage brush and leaves of the oak and elm trees that remain among the cement foundations of the Manzanar city of barracks.

The rising and setting suns over the past seventy years since that day of infamy have blinded the landscape of what was once perpetrated on the nearly 10,000 men, women and children who had been incarcerated because of their Japanese ancestry and heritage. Only slight traces and gestures are left to remind us not to forget.

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Whispers from the Apple Orchard

20 x 14 inches  |  covered with Katazome-shi paper from Japan

6 archival inkjet pigment prints on Ilford Gold Fiber Silk  |  19 x 13 inches

edition of 3

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