It Was a Beautiful Dream

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The difficult Indian problem cannot be solved permanently at this end of the line. It requires the fulfillment of Congress of the treaty obligations that the Indians were entreated and coerced into signing. They signed away a valuable portion of their reservation, and it is now occupied by white people, for which they have received nothing.

– telegram from General Nelson Miles, Commander of the Military Division of the Missouri in Rapid City, South Dakota to General John Schofield. Commanding General of the United States Army, in Washington, D.C., December 19, 1890.

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On the morning of December 29, 1890, near Wounded Knee Creek on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment surrounded and entered an encampment of the Lakota. In an attempt to disarm them, a scuffle broke out and indiscriminate gunfire erupted, resulting in least 90 warriors and approximately 200 women and children of the Lakota being killed and 51 wounded. Thirty-one soldiers of the 7th Cavalry also died, and 39 were wounded.

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I can still see the butchered women and children lying heaped and scattered all along the crooked gulch as plain as when I saw them with eyes still young. And I can see that something else died there in the bloody mud, and was buried in the blizzard. A people’s dream died there. It was a beautiful dream.

– Heȟáka Sápa (Black Elk), Oglala Sioux leader, 1932, from his oral testimony of the Wounded Knee Massacre on December 29, 1890.

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It Was a Beautiful Dream

20 x 14 inches | covered with Shizen screen printed paper from India

4 archival inkjet pigment prints on Ilford Gold Fiber Silk | 19 x 13 inches and verso

edition of 3

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